C0816 Market Potential for Low GI Ingredient for Sugars

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Recently there has been a trend towards replacing or partly replacing sucrose and other calorific sugars in foods with lower calorie or lower glycaemic index (GI) substitutes. There are some possible opportunities relating to the GI ingredient area, namely arabinose and polyphenols from sugar cane; this report provides a deeper understanding of how the GI market is developing and which opportunity would have the most potential. How can the concept of lowering the glycaemic index of sucrose be transformed into a viable business opportunity.

Click here for a PDF of the contents of the study or look below for an outline.

Table of Contents

Objective & Scope

Background

Method

Principal Findings

    • Market
    • Trends
    • Consumer awareness
    • Regulatory
    • Science
    • Recent Research on GI
    • Patents
    • Regulatory (WHO/FAO)
    • GI Survey

Conclusions

    • The Opportunity
    • The Choice of Ingredient
    • The Marketing Approach

Answers to Specific Questions

    • Are the Scandinavian/Nordic and/or the European consumer markets ready for low GI claiming products in general?
    • Is the low GI concept only for diabetics /pre-diabetics or for all?
    • Is the scientific base strong enough to bring a “low GI”-sucrose concept to markets (Scandinavia/Baltic) and to Europe?
    • Arabinose/xylose vs polyphenols, or better alternatives?
    • Soft claims / hard claims?
    • Individual ingredient claims vs. claim of impact in food & beverage products?
    • If yes to the above, what strategy should choose in bringing the concept to market?

Recommendations

Glycaemic Index Overview

  • Market & Trends
    • Focus on Bakery
  • Glycaemic Index – Definitions
    • What is GI?
    • Measuring the GI
    • Australian Initiative (University of Sydney): The Glycaemic Index Symbol Program
    • Program Eligibility
    • Guidelines for Product Acceptability
    • General Exclusion
    • Consumer Information
    • Examples of GI Testing Programmes
    • GI Database
    • Other Initiatives in South Africa and Europe
    • Summary of Low GI Ingredients
  • Global Market & Products
    • Australia
    • New Zealand
    • USA
    • Europe
  • South Africa
    • Focus on Low GI Market in Scandinavia
    • Sweden

Companies

  • Food ingredient companies with low GI enabling ingredients
    • 6 companies
  • Food Companies with Low GI products
    • 8 companies
  • Retailers
    • 7 companies
  • Universities and Industry Associations
    • Committee of the American Association of Cereal Chemists (AACC) International
    • Calorie Control Council

Result from a GI consumer Survey

    • Description of Statistics
    • GI Knowledge
    • Sugar Consumption
    • Sugar and Health
    • Label Preferences
    • Premium payers

Contact Reports

  • Food ingredient companies with low GI enabling ingredients
    • 3 companies
  • Food companies with low GI products
    • 9 companies
  • Retailers
    • 3 companies
  • Others
    • 6 companies

News

  • 47 items

Patents

  • Patent Law in Japan
    • The Types of Intellectual Property Rights and the System for their Protection in Japan
  • Japanese Patents
    • 38 items
  • Polyphenols and Glucose
    • 9 items
  • Patents relating to hyperglycaemia and xylose
    • 4 items
  • Patent Relating to falcanoids (flavonoids + a sugar e.g. glucose)
  • Recent Arabinose Patents
    • 9 items

Recent Research

  • FAO/WHO Opinion
    • FAO/WHO Scientific Update on carbohydrates in human nutrition: conclusions
  • Arabinose
    • Nutritional and Physiological Functions and Uses of L-Arabinose.
  • Sugar Cane Polyphenols
    • Immunostimulating effects of the polyphenol-rich fraction of sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum L.) extract in chickens
  • Glycaemic Index Research
    • 40 items

Appendix

  • Consumer Survey relating to the GI Concept in food

Tables

  • Table 1 Patents relating to L-arabinose filed prior to 2001
  • Table 2 Alternative low GI sugar concepts and its respective advantages and disadvantages
  • Table 3 Market segments with potential using the ‘Longer Lasting Energy’ concept
  • Table 4 Alternative low GI sugar concepts and its respective advantages and disadvantages
  • Table 5 Definitions
  • Table 6 Examples of Low GI versus High GI
  • Table 7 Products with approved product specific health claims in Sweden, 2007
  • Table 8 Requirements to label food products with a low GI claim in Sweden, 2007
  • Table 9 Products approved in Sweden for a GI related claim
  • Table 10 Age distribution of respondents by country
  • Table 11 BMI distribution of respondents by country
  • Table 12 GI Knowledge of respondents by country
  • Table 13 Distribution of respondents by number of correct answers relating to GI
  • Table 14 Distribution of actual GI knowledge by age group
  • Table 15 Concern about the health affects of sugar, by country
  • Table 16 Concern about the health affects of sugar, by country
  • Table 17 Concern about the health affects of sugar, by BMI status
  • Table 18 Health concern type, by BMI status
  • Table 19 Label preference for sugar, by country
  • Table 20 Label preference for sugar, by age group
  • Table 21 Label preference for sugar, by BMI status group
  • Table 22 Willingness to pay a premium, by label preference category
  • Table 23 Recent patents on glycaemic properties of food by year and country
  • Table 24 Recent patents on glycaemic index by year and country
  • Table 25 Summary of Japanese IPR law and protection periods
  • Table 26 Patents relating to L-arabinose filed prior to 2001

Figures

  • Figure 1 Global low GI Bakery Market, by Region (2005)
  • Figure 2 US low GI Bakery Market, by category (2005)
  • Figure 3 Effect of high and low GI foods
  • Figure 4 Specifications for Marking Products with the GIFSA Logo
  • Figure 5 Chemical structure of Isomaltulose
  • Figure 6 Palatinit’s manufacturing process of Isomalt
  • Figure 7 Age distribution of respondents, by country
  • Figure 8 BMI distribution of respondents by country
  • Figure 9 GI Knowledge of respondents by country
  • Figure 10 Distribution of respondents by number of correct answers relating to GI
  • Figure 11 Distribution of actual GI knowledge by age group
  • Figure 12 Average annual sugar consumption (kg/year) by country
  • Figure 13 Typical use of sugar by country
  • Figure 14 Concern about the health affects of sugar, by BMI status
  • Figure 15 Health concern type by country
  • Figure 16 The level of consumer understanding has a crucial impact on “go to market” strategies and related communication budgets
  • Figure 17 Blood glucose response after consumption of isomaltulose compared to sucrose

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